Scheme


Topic | v1 | created by jjones |
Description

Scheme is a minimalist dialect of the Lisp family of programming languages. Scheme consists of a small standard core with several tools for language extension. Scheme was created during the 1970s at the MIT AI Lab and released by its developers, Guy L. Steele and Gerald Jay Sussman, via a series of memos now known as the Lambda Papers. It was the first dialect of Lisp to choose lexical scope and the first to require implementations to perform tail-call optimization, giving stronger support for functional programming and associated techniques such as recursive algorithms. It was also one of the first programming languages to support first-class continuations. It had a significant influence on the effort that led to the development of Common Lisp. The Scheme language is standardized in the official IEEE standard and a de facto standard called the Revisedn Report on the Algorithmic Language Scheme (RnRS).


Relations

is Programming language

A programming language is a formal language comprising a set of instructions that produce various kin...

is Lisp

Lisp (historically LISP) is a family of programming languages with a long history and a distinctive,...


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Resources

treated in Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days

A practical introduction to the programming language Scheme.